Map of Brazil Brazil

Total REDD+ Finance Committed:

$819,663,710

Total REDD+ Finance Disbursed:

$266,180,876

Brazil is the largest country in South America and the fifth largest and most populous in the world. Forests cover about three-fifths of Brazil’s land area, which represents over 14% of the world’s forest coverage, including one-third of the world's remaining rainforests.

Despite the fact that the deforestation rate in the Brazilian Amazon has decreased in the last decade, deforestation continues to be a major issue. Currently, six of the Amazon states are a part of the Governor’s Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF). The goal of the GCF is to connect these states and the fourteen others in the partnership with market and non-market finance. Brazil is also in the process of developing a national REDD strategy.

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Recipients

Financing flows and institutions receiving funds committed for REDD+ activities in Brazil:

Commitments to recipients by location and type

 

Commitments by institution type and year

 
   
  • Commitments to recipients by location and type

    The initial institutions or “first recipients” receiving funding for REDD+ activities in Brazil are predominantly based in Brazil, with 97.4% of the total committed funds scheduled to be received by Brazilian entities including, the Amazon Fund, the national government, sub-national governments, and Brazilian NGOs and academic institutions. During the period of 2009 to 2012, 80.4% of funding has been channeled through the Amazon Fund.

    In general, donor governments are not recipients of international REDD+ finance. However in some instances, specific donor government agencies receive funds from another agency within their own government. Flows of finance from a donor government to a donor government might take place where development aid or climate finance is disbursed from one centralized department within a government with projects/activities implemented by other government agencies. In Brazil, USAID committed US$3.5 million to the US Forestry Service between 2010 and 2011 to provide institutional and technical capacity building to sub-national governments.

    Secondary institutions or “second recipients” receiving REDD+ finance are also displayed in the chart. During the period from 2009 to 2012, approximately one-third, or 31% of the total committed funds were passed onto second recipients, which include Brazilian NGOs and academic institutions, as well as the federal and sub-national governments. The large majority of this funding was channeled through the Amazon fund; however some additional finance was self funded by the states of Rondônia and Amazonas.

  • Commitments by institution type and year

    An annual breakdown highlights that there has been a significant steady increase in overall commitments during 2010 and 2011, and slight decrease in 2012. During the four year period, the Amazon fund received the majority of commitments. Aside from the Amazon Fund, the Brazilian, national government received the second largest share of REDD+ commitments, with a majority of funds committed in 2010 and 2011. Funds directed towards Brazilian NGOs and academic institutions more than doubled in the between 2009 and 2010, increasing from US$5.6 million to US$13 million. Since that time, the amount of REDD+ finance flowing to this type of recipient has remained relatively constant.

    Donor government agencies are channeling US$3.5m through other donor government agencies. In general, donor governments are not recipients of international REDD+ finance. However in some instances, specific donor government agencies receive funds from another agency within their own government. Flows of finance from a donor government to a donor government might take place where development aid or climate finance is disbursed from one centralized department within a government with projects/activities implemented by other government agencies. For example in Brazil, between 2010 and 2011, USAID committed US$3.5 million to the US Forestry Service between 2010 and 2011 to provide institutional and technical capacity building to sub-national governments.

Data Source: Brazil

The data presented below highlights levels of REDD+ financing committed and disbursed, main donors, recipients and REDD+ activities in the period between 2009 and 2012. For more information on our methodology, please visit our FAQs page.